Politics Articles

Criticism of women’s health study woefully misplaced

Austin American-Statesman, March 10, 2016

After the Oscar victory for “Spotlight,” let’s shine one on the effects of excluding Planned Parenthood affiliates from the Texas Women’s Health Program and the appalling imbroglio after the study was published Feb. 3 in The New England Journal of Medicine. For background, when the federal government refused to allow — and the courts blocked […]


Crosses on patrol cars? Let’s try pyramids instead

Austin American-Statesman, January 24, 2016

Last summer, the police department in Childress, a Panhandle community deep in the Bible Belt, placed “In God We Trust” decals on the back of police patrol cars, prompting Gov. Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton to fall all over themselves eagerly heralding the idea, each giving legal arguments why it is OK. Not […]


Politicians need to butt out of medical board investigations

The Dallas Morning News, December 8, 2015

Texas politicians have a nasty habit of interfering with medical board investigations. They need to butt out. The health professions boards exist to protect you and me from harm, thus are some of the most important agencies in state government. Despite parsimonious funding, they do a fine job of governing, licensing and disciplining doctors, nurses, […]


Planned Parenthood attack has nothing to do with women’s health

Austin American-Statesman, October 25, 2015

Now that Texas has officially alerted Planned Parenthood of their intention to yank Medicaid funding, that decision admittedly based on doctored-up videos taken by stealth anti-abortion activists, it’s time to get honest about what’s really going on here and in backward states all over the country. Make no mistake, it’s not about protecting the unborn, […]


Medicare put an end to segregation in hospitals

Austin American-Statesman, August 16, 2015

I wonder how many folks realize that Medicare brought about the end of racial segregation in hospitals. I didn’t know because I was asleep in college when Medicare was signed into law. Heck, I didn’t even realize hospitals were segregated until a few years ago when a colleague made it real to me with a […]


Why local prosecution of crimes by state officials is a bad idea

Austin American-Statesman, June 17, 2015

As Republicans pound their chests trumpeting the success of the 84th legislative session, many of us are left wondering which was the lousiest bill passed. Open carry? Guns on campus? “Repatriating” Texas gold bullion from Fort Knox to a depository in Texas — huh? Let’s not forget failing to pass a ban on texting while […]


Downtown blues: Boozers, losers and cellphone users

Austin American-Statesman, December 30, 2014

This year marks the tenth anniversary since my husband Ian and I had three garage sales, sold his truck and downsized into a 1,500 square-foot space downtown. (My son Burton was prompted to write that we were in the prime of peri-geriatric, empty-nest decadence. But enough about Burton.) It seems like everyone has asked us […]


Abstaining is not the way to serve the public interest

Austin American-Statesman, September 12, 2014

Of all the monikers for an elected official to strive to be known as, “the abstainer” is not one of them. That’s how Travis County Commissioner Ron Davis is known, and as a Sept. 8 American-Statesman story explained, on 26 votes cast in the 2014 budget sessions, Davis racked up a staggering 19 abstentions, four […]


Dress-down of media merited regarding Hillary Clinton coverage

Austin American-Statesman, June 25, 2014

The line into BookPeople on June 20 snaked from West Sixth Street and Lamar Boulevard (in full sun) north to West Ninth Street, east to Henderson Street, then south back to West Sixth Street. I live a few hundred feet away and was on an errand when I saw it. I pulled my scooter over […]


Predictions of water wars not far-fetched

Austin American Statesman, February 5, 2014

Long before “global warming” was a household term, my father-in-law, Dr. Jack Inglis, would pronounce that it would all come down to our killing each other over water. The conversation-stopping concept seemed, at best, farfetched. The respected Texas A&M ecology professor, who died 16 years ago in an ultralight crash, would have taken great interest […]