Health Care Policy Articles

Health partnership responds when parents react to fewer RNs in schools

Austin American-Statesman, October 1, 2017

Since the Gallup Poll began ranking “most trusted professions” in 1999, nurses have placed No. 1 every year with the exception of 2001, when firefighters took the spot after 9/11. People have depended on and trusted nurses through life’s most intimate moments: birth and dying and times in between of injury and sickness. And parents […]

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In America, pursuing health care reform is like Sisyphus pushing the stone

Austin American-Statesman, July 23, 2017

In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was condemned to ceaselessly roll a giant stone to the summit, only for it to roll back down of its own weight. In trying to fix health care, we Americans are like Sisyphus. Bearing witness to the strenuous futility is exhausting. First, let’s take a look back to see how our health care […]

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Bills would allow nurses to offset doctor shortages

Austin American-Statesman, March 28, 2017

While Congress proved incompetent to improve health care, Texas legislators have a golden opportunity right now to dramatically increase access to care. How? By substantially increasing the number of primary care providers. And … it wouldn’t cost a dime. We’ve got a real problem here. According to The Commonwealth Fund, in 2015 Texas ranked dead […]

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Ann Richards warned us; now we march to protect women’s rights

Houston Chronicle and Austin American-Statesman, January 19, 2017

I’ll be marching in the Texas version of the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21. Why? Because women’s reproductive rights are being taken away, just as the late Gov. Ann Richards predicted. On a brisk night in October of 1990, many of us had gathered for a hastily called rally for gubernatorial candidate Ann […]

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Lasting health care legacies built by two caring, faithful Austinintes

Austin American-Statesman, October 28, 2016

If Austin had a Top 10 Most Influential Women in Health Care Award, Dr. Mary Lou Adams and Trish Young Brown would certainly rank high on the list. Guided by a strong and abiding faith, both women were on a mission — and in a hurry. The mission? To see to it that the underserved […]

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Criticism of women’s health study woefully misplaced

Austin American-Statesman, March 10, 2016

After the Oscar victory for “Spotlight,” let’s shine one on the effects of excluding Planned Parenthood affiliates from the Texas Women’s Health Program and the appalling imbroglio after the study was published Feb. 3 in The New England Journal of Medicine. For background, when the federal government refused to allow — and the courts blocked […]

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Politicians need to butt out of medical board investigations

The Dallas Morning News, December 8, 2015

Texas politicians have a nasty habit of interfering with medical board investigations. They need to butt out. The health professions boards exist to protect you and me from harm, thus are some of the most important agencies in state government. Despite parsimonious funding, they do a fine job of governing, licensing and disciplining doctors, nurses, […]

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Medicare put an end to segregation in hospitals

Austin American-Statesman, August 16, 2015

I wonder how many folks realize that Medicare brought about the end of racial segregation in hospitals. I didn’t know because I was asleep in college when Medicare was signed into law. Heck, I didn’t even realize hospitals were segregated until a few years ago when a colleague made it real to me with a […]

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Measles outbreak is understandable in West Africa, not in USA

Austin American-Statesman, March 17, 2015

As if 24,000 people being stricken and 10,000 people dying from Ebola in West Africa weren’t enough, now the area is being hit with a measles outbreak that could result in 2,000 to 16,000 children dying, according to a study released March 12 in the journal Science. The second of the one-two punch suffered by […]

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Ebola errors in Dallas will rewrite disease protocols

Austin American-Statesman, October 19, 2014

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hospitals and the American public were taken totally off guard by our first Ebola patient. The CDC’s reaction has been at best overly confident and at worst incompetent, cavalier and smug. Especially when you consider that we’ve known about Ebola since the 1970s, that it has killed thousands […]

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