Nursing Articles

Bills would allow nurses to offset doctor shortages

Austin American-Statesman, March 28, 2017

While Congress proved incompetent to improve health care, Texas legislators have a golden opportunity right now to dramatically increase access to care. How? By substantially increasing the number of primary care providers. And … it wouldn’t cost a dime. We’ve got a real problem here. According to The Commonwealth Fund, in 2015 Texas ranked dead […]

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Stories of misery, humiliation will make your holiday letter a success

Austin American-Statesman, December 17, 2016

It’s that time of year again. Part of getting into the holiday spirit is reconnecting with family and friends. We want to hear how they’re doing and share how we’re doing. But we’ve all gotten those letters we can’t finish, either because they’re too long or too full of news of young Ella’s nauseating excellence […]

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Lasting health care legacies built by two caring, faithful Austinintes

Austin American-Statesman, October 28, 2016

If Austin had a Top 10 Most Influential Women in Health Care Award, Dr. Mary Lou Adams and Trish Young Brown would certainly rank high on the list. Guided by a strong and abiding faith, both women were on a mission — and in a hurry. The mission? To see to it that the underserved […]

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Why local prosecution of crimes by state officials is a bad idea

Austin American-Statesman, June 17, 2015

As Republicans pound their chests trumpeting the success of the 84th legislative session, many of us are left wondering which was the lousiest bill passed. Open carry? Guns on campus? “Repatriating” Texas gold bullion from Fort Knox to a depository in Texas — huh? Let’s not forget failing to pass a ban on texting while […]

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Measles outbreak is understandable in West Africa, not in USA

Austin American-Statesman, March 17, 2015

As if 24,000 people being stricken and 10,000 people dying from Ebola in West Africa weren’t enough, now the area is being hit with a measles outbreak that could result in 2,000 to 16,000 children dying, according to a study released March 12 in the journal Science. The second of the one-two punch suffered by […]

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Ebola errors in Dallas will rewrite disease protocols

Austin American-Statesman, October 19, 2014

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hospitals and the American public were taken totally off guard by our first Ebola patient. The CDC’s reaction has been at best overly confident and at worst incompetent, cavalier and smug. Especially when you consider that we’ve known about Ebola since the 1970s, that it has killed thousands […]

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Nurses, the heart of health care

Austin American-Statesman, May 5, 2014

Surprisingly, the eminent Arnold Relman — physician, researcher, author, former Harvard professor and editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine who frequently speaks out about what’s wrong with the U.S. health care system — only recently discovered the value of nursing. Last year, at age 90, Dr. Relman fell down stairs in […]

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McPhee saved the babies, left spiritual legacy

Austin American-Statesman, April 19, 2014

The iconic Sr. Mary Rose McPhee, who died April 15 at the age of 95 at a Daughters of Charity retirement center in Evansville, Ind., was a celestial force in the lives of many thousands of people in Austin. She was the chief executive officer of what is now Seton Medical Center Austin when I […]

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Vaccine fear derails triumph over disease

Austin American-Statesman, April 1, 2014

Arguably the greatest success story in public health, vaccines demonstrate the triumph of human achievement over disease. But during the last decade or so, I’ve watched through my fingers as vaccine risks get more attention than the diseases they prevent. Before I retired from neonatal intensive care a couple of years ago, convincing parents to […]

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Plugging the mental health care gap in Austin

Austin American-Statesman, December 8, 2013

The Seton Healthcare Family’s announcement Tuesday to open the region’s first psychiatric emergency department raises a simple question: How has Austin gotten by for so long without one? The answer is equally simple: Not very well. A patient in an acute psychiatric crisis needs a medical assessment that often requires laboratory or imaging studies to […]

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